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# Friday, 23 March 2012
VS11Beta

This post is also published on The SharePoint Bar

The 16th of February, Microsoft released the Beta version of the next Visual Studio development environment, called Visual Studio 11. I made a quick tour of it, and I wanted to see what will be new in this new version of Visual Studio. But, before going in the observations I made, I want to emphasize that it is still a Beta version of the tool. Things can change and what I am writing here will probably be wrong in the couple of next months, when the final release of Visual Studio will come out.

First, as for the previous version of VS, it exists in several editions : Ultimate, Premium, Professional and also the Express one for Windows 8.

The first thing that we can see is the user interface that completely changed, starting with the splash screen of the installation and also the different screens during the setup wizard.

VS11SplashScreen

This is confirmed when we open the tool, all is in gray and black. People will love it or will hate it, but personally, in a development tool, I am not fan of having a Christmas tree with a lot of different colors.

In this post, I will focus on the SharePoint development aspects of Visual Studio and I will not go in too much details, keeping this tour at a high level.

So, when we want to create a new SharePoint project, we can see that it is no longer possible to develop for SharePoint 2007. Indeed, the SharePoint 2007 project template is not available. Maybe it will come in the final release, but with SharePoint vNext coming (we still not know whether it will be SharePoint 15, SharePoint 2013 or even something else), I doubt that it will be added. As it is shown in the picture below, the number of templates is limited to the strict necessary : an empty SharePoint project, importing a solution package, importing a reusable workflow, or starting a Silverlight or a visual web part projects. The Silverlight web part project is new, but I will come back to it further in this post.

NewSPProject

The new project creation wizard has not changed and it is still asking whether you want to create a sandbox or a farm solution, and also where is your SharePoint installation. What has not changed, or at least what I saw on my setup, is that you still cannot develop for SharePoint if you don’t have it installed on your development machine.

NewSolutionWizard

Once your project is created and you want to create a new item, you have the similar choices as with the previous version of Visual Studio, only 3 types have been added : Silverlight web part, site column and site definition. Let’s focus on these three items a bit more and also on the List and the Content Type items, starting with the last one.

NewProjectItem

Content Types

When you want to add a Content Type, it starts with the wizard, asking you from which existing content type you want yours to inherit. Once you have selected the parent content type, you will have a pretty nice surprise. There is now a visual editor for the content type, split in two tabs : Columns and Content Type. The first tab, Columns enables you to select the site columns to use, giving you the type of the column at the same time, and the possibility to specify if a value is required. The second tab, Content Type, is used to define the name of the content type, in which group to send it and few other settings. Of course, if you want to go in the CAML definition, you can still open the .xml file.

NewCTCTColumnsTabCTInfo

List

Even if the List project item was already existing in VS2010, Microsoft added a visual designer to it. It is now possible to select the site columns, the content types and also to define the views for the list. A great improvements for the developers, in my opinion.

ListColumnsTabListViewsTabListCTSelection

Site Definition

Site definition is a new project item coming with VS11 and what it mainly does is to create the item with the two necessary files : onet.xml and the webtemp file. That said, you still have to manually edit the files.

Silverlight web part

The interesting thing with this new project item is that it creates in reality two items : a Silverlight project containing then elements like the xaml files, and and Silverlight web part project item, which contains nothing more than the Elements.xml and the .webpart files.

NewSLWP

At the end, VS11 is promising for the SharePoint developments, but we should not expect too much from the next version. Some really nice improvements are already there, maybe some new ones will join in the final release, but again, this was just a first lap around the functionalities offered by the beta version of Visual Studio 11. I will come back on specific topics in several other posts in a near future.

Stay tuned !

Friday, 23 March 2012 20:12:00 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | SharePoint
# Tuesday, 21 February 2012

Developing ClickOnce WPF application, it was needed to implement a spell checker for the different text boxes of the application. Our development environment was Windows 7, and using the .NET Framework 4 both the framework and the OS in english. The problem appeared when we tested the application, where the spell check in french or other non-english languages was not working at all. After several readings on the web and other experimentations using a quick-and-dirty application, I would like to give my findings here.

Basically, the XAML of my testing application is the one below :

<Window x:Class="TestApplication.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <RichTextBox Margin="0,52,0,65" Name="rtbText" SpellCheck.IsEnabled="True" Language="fr">
            <FlowDocument>
                <Paragraph>
                    The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
                    Le renard brun rapide saute sur le chien paresseux
                    Die schnelle braune Fuchs springt über den faulen Hund
                </Paragraph>
            </FlowDocument>
        </RichTextBox>
        <Button Content="FR" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Name="btnFR" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="30" Click="btnFR_Click" />
        <Button Content="EN" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="36,0,0,0" Name="btnEN" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="30" Click="btnEN_Click" />
        <Button Content="Save" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="428,0,0,0" Name="btnSave" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="75" Click="btnSave_Click" />
        <RichTextBox Language="fr" Margin="0,264,97,0" Name="rtbSwitch" SpellCheck.IsEnabled="True">
        </RichTextBox>
        <Button Content="DE" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="72,0,0,0" Name="btnDE" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="30" Click="btnDE_Click" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

Which gives the window below :

image

When one of the upper-left button is clicked, a code similar to the one below is executed :

private void btnEN_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  TextRange tr = new TextRange(rtbText.Document.ContentStart, rtbText.Document.ContentEnd);
  tr.ApplyPropertyValue(FlowDocument.LanguageProperty, "en");
}

 

Basically, it takes the whole content of the Rich Text Box and change the “Language” property to the language in which the spell check has to be done.

Now, the problem is that if you compile the application on the .NET Framework 4, it will not work........unless the corresponding language packs of the Framework. They are all available on the Microsoft Download Center. Indeed, according to the table below, as soon as you use the .NET Framework 4, the language packs have to be installed, whereas if you use the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1, it depends on the platform on which the application is running. On Windows Vista and Windows 7, no need to install the language packs, for Windows XP, they are needed :

  Windows XP Windows Vista Windows 7
.NET 3.5 SP1 Language Packs Needed No need for the Language Packs No need for the Language Packs
.NET 4 Language Packs Needed Language Packs Needed Language Packs Needed

 

So, reverting back to the .NET Framework 3.5 made the spell checking to work.

That would be it, but, when typing new text, the spell check was not working and the reason can be found in the XAML extract of the Rich Text Box (“Save” button). When switching to english, I supposed that the new text would be checked against the english language, which is completely wrong. The XAML below shows the text right after the switch to the english language :

<Section xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xml:space="preserve" TextAlignment="Left" LineHeight="Auto" IsHyphenationEnabled="False" xml:lang="fr" FlowDirection="LeftToRight" NumberSubstitution.CultureSource="Text" NumberSubstitution.Substitution="AsCulture" FontFamily="Segoe UI" FontStyle="Normal" FontWeight="Normal" FontStretch="Normal" FontSize="12" Foreground="#FF000000" Typography.StandardLigatures="True" Typography.ContextualLigatures="True" Typography.DiscretionaryLigatures="False" Typography.HistoricalLigatures="False" Typography.AnnotationAlternates="0" Typography.ContextualAlternates="True" Typography.HistoricalForms="False" Typography.Kerning="True" Typography.CapitalSpacing="False" Typography.CaseSensitiveForms="False" Typography.StylisticSet1="False" Typography.StylisticSet2="False" Typography.StylisticSet3="False" Typography.StylisticSet4="False" Typography.StylisticSet5="False" Typography.StylisticSet6="False" Typography.StylisticSet7="False" Typography.StylisticSet8="False" Typography.StylisticSet9="False" Typography.StylisticSet10="False" Typography.StylisticSet11="False" Typography.StylisticSet12="False" Typography.StylisticSet13="False" Typography.StylisticSet14="False" Typography.StylisticSet15="False" Typography.StylisticSet16="False" Typography.StylisticSet17="False" Typography.StylisticSet18="False" Typography.StylisticSet19="False" Typography.StylisticSet20="False" Typography.Fraction="Normal" Typography.SlashedZero="False" Typography.MathematicalGreek="False" Typography.EastAsianExpertForms="False" Typography.Variants="Normal" Typography.Capitals="Normal" Typography.NumeralStyle="Normal" Typography.NumeralAlignment="Normal" Typography.EastAsianWidths="Normal" Typography.EastAsianLanguage="Normal" Typography.StandardSwashes="0" Typography.ContextualSwashes="0" Typography.StylisticAlternates="0"><Paragraph><Run xml:lang="en">The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog Le renard brun rapide saute sur le chien paresseux Die schnelle braune Fuchs springt über den faulen Hund</Run></Paragraph></Section>

The interesting part is the last <Run> element, that contains an xml:lang=”en” attribute, specifying that the enclosed text is in english. When some text is entered, the corresponding XAML becomes the following :

<Section xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xml:space="preserve" TextAlignment="Left" LineHeight="Auto" IsHyphenationEnabled="False" xml:lang="fr" FlowDirection="LeftToRight" NumberSubstitution.CultureSource="Text" NumberSubstitution.Substitution="AsCulture" FontFamily="Segoe UI" FontStyle="Normal" FontWeight="Normal" FontStretch="Normal" FontSize="12" Foreground="#FF000000" Typography.StandardLigatures="True" Typography.ContextualLigatures="True" Typography.DiscretionaryLigatures="False" Typography.HistoricalLigatures="False" Typography.AnnotationAlternates="0" Typography.ContextualAlternates="True" Typography.HistoricalForms="False" Typography.Kerning="True" Typography.CapitalSpacing="False" Typography.CaseSensitiveForms="False" Typography.StylisticSet1="False" Typography.StylisticSet2="False" Typography.StylisticSet3="False" Typography.StylisticSet4="False" Typography.StylisticSet5="False" Typography.StylisticSet6="False" Typography.StylisticSet7="False" Typography.StylisticSet8="False" Typography.StylisticSet9="False" Typography.StylisticSet10="False" Typography.StylisticSet11="False" Typography.StylisticSet12="False" Typography.StylisticSet13="False" Typography.StylisticSet14="False" Typography.StylisticSet15="False" Typography.StylisticSet16="False" Typography.StylisticSet17="False" Typography.StylisticSet18="False" Typography.StylisticSet19="False" Typography.StylisticSet20="False" Typography.Fraction="Normal" Typography.SlashedZero="False" Typography.MathematicalGreek="False" Typography.EastAsianExpertForms="False" Typography.Variants="Normal" Typography.Capitals="Normal" Typography.NumeralStyle="Normal" Typography.NumeralAlignment="Normal" Typography.EastAsianWidths="Normal" Typography.EastAsianLanguage="Normal" Typography.StandardSwashes="0" Typography.ContextualSwashes="0" Typography.StylisticAlternates="0"><Paragraph><Run xml:lang="en">The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog Le renard brun rapide saute sur le chien paresseux Die schnelle braune Fuchs springt über den faulen Hund</Run><Run xml:lang="fr-ch"> another text </Run></Paragraph></Section>

Surprisingly, the last <Run> element is now using the xml:lang=”fr-ch” language. What happens ? It simply takes the input language of the keyboard. It also means that if you want to change the on-the-fly spell check, the input language has to be changed. As an example, the click event handler written above becomes :

private void btnEN_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  TextRange tr = new TextRange(rtbText.Document.ContentStart, rtbText.Document.ContentEnd);
  tr.ApplyPropertyValue(FlowDocument.LanguageProperty, "en");
  InputLanguageManager.Current.CurrentInputLanguage = new CultureInfo("en-us");
}

At the last line of the event handler, the keyboard input language is changed and you will notice it in the tray bar, if displaying the current input language, that the locale has changed. Very important, the culture has to absolutely match an input language installed in the regional settings.

Changing the input language is not the best way as it changes the layout of the keyboard (for example, switching to en-us a fr-ch keyboard layout will lose the accented characters) and so far I have not yet found a way to workaround this.

Tuesday, 21 February 2012 23:12:20 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
.NET | Programming
# Wednesday, 02 February 2011

orchardlogo The last week-end I wanted to give a try to the install of the free and open-source content management application, named Orchard. I knew before that Orchard is based on the .NET framework 4.0 and that could cause some issues with my existing blog engine (dasBlog). Nevertheless, I decided to take the chance and to try to make then working together.

First, the deployment. This is really simple as I took the Orchard web which only needs to be copied on the web server. This did not cause any problem.

Then, update of the configuration and this became more difficult. I had to make the blog engine virtual directory to specifically use the .NET 2.0 framework and breaking the inheritance of web.config, using the <location> element. The Orchard install then went almost fine, but the blog was in a very bad state, complaining that the file eurl.axd/[AVeryBigNumber] was not found.

In fact, as soon as you set your IIS root application to run the .NET framework 4.0, no matter the configuration inheritance is broken or using the .NET 2.0 framework using a dedicated application pool, the sub virtual directories detect that the version 4.0 is present. For a complete explanation, please read the ASP.NET 4 breaking-changes whitepaper.

The conclusion of this journey is that I had to revert back to a plain .NET 2.0 runtime in order to have this blog back up and running.

Thanks to the Brinkster support team who spend long time to help me and to try different configurations on the server. But unfortunately, except having another web site, there is no solution, as changing a registry value is of course not possible in such environment.

Wednesday, 02 February 2011 21:02:05 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Blog Life | Programming
# Wednesday, 27 January 2010
Google has recently announced a new project : a new system programming language named "Go". Here is a little summary of what this language is.
Wednesday, 27 January 2010 15:24:29 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Tuesday, 05 January 2010

Title : Foundations of BizTalk Server 2006

Author : Daniel Woolston

Summary :
BizTalk Server 2006 was until last year, the latest version of the middleware product from Microsoft. Since, the new version, BizTalk Server 2009, has been released. Despite BizTalk Server 2006 is not the first or second version of the product, it really needs documentation on how to use and develop on this platform as it is absolutely difficult or impossible to start on such product like this.
The book is structured around the different component or pieces of BizTalk : Messaging, Schemas, Maps, Ports, Orchestrations. It covers all the aspects of the product even tackling the application deployment.
It is full of useful screenshots and the explanations are clear enough even if you don't have the software at hand.

Review :
Working with BizTalk since couple of years, I found the book quite basic. Ok, the title contains "Foundations", so don't expect advanced explanation but rather take it as a first look at BizTalk. A good example is to read it before an intermediate or advanced training. At the end, it gives an excellent overview of what can be done and how can specific problems can be solved with BizTalk Server 2006. Another good point is that it is not a big pad to read and can be absorbed in a week-end :-)

Tuesday, 05 January 2010 17:59:14 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Book Review | Programming | Technical
# Thursday, 15 January 2009

Summary :
F# is a new language that is coming in the pipe of Microsoft for the Visual Studio platform. It aims to tackle the functional programming paradigm eventhough it is possible to use the imperative or object oriented programming.
Robert Pickering starts his book by explaining the basics of F#, how to get and how to use the tools. Then, the book describes the F# syntax to be used in the three language paradigm, functional programming, imperative programming and finally object oriented programming. Among other things, the notion of type inference is presented. Once the syntax is presented, the book describes the way to develop web, windows or even WPF applications using the .NET framework. Data access is also addressed using the current technologies available, such as ADO.NET or LINQ. Then, a quick look at DSLs, compilation and code generation is given, presenting the lex and yacc tools coming with the language. Finally, a full chapter is dedicated to the interoperability between .NET and F#, because even if F# is based on the CLI, the language introduces several types that are not available in the other .NET languages (C# or VB.NET).

Review :
Discovering a new language is really interesting and with F#, it is the occasion to see a new paragigm, functional programming. In really short, with F#, everything is a value, even a function. It means that you can use a function as a function parameter. The concept of type inference is also very attracting. The book is very easy to understand and a lot of little examples are explained in details, making the reading very fast. The first half of the book is dedicated to the language itself. The second half is more on using the .NET framework and I would say that it is the less interesting of the book. Indeed, during the first part, you have came across various examples using types and classes of the framework and user interface development being web or windows, or data access meaning that the second part does not bring a lot a information. Once you know these topics from the .NET documentation or from another book and once you have read how to access the .NET BCL from F#, then this part is pretty straightforward and not really useful. Moreover, the examples used to depict the topics are more explaining how to use the BCL classes than the language itself. Nevertheless, the last parts discussing the interoperability and the possibility of generating DSLs are more interesting.
My final words are that it is a very intersting book if you want to see another land (functional programming). Unfortunately, on my bookshelf, I also have "Expert F#" that I just opened to see what is inside and I saw that it takes the explanations and descriptions of the language from the beginning. If I had knew that before, maybe I would have bought this one instead. So, if the goal is just to scratch the surface of F#, "Foundations of F#" is the best suited, otherwise, if the goal is to go really deeper in the topic, then prefer "Expert F#" (a review of that one will be posted).

Thursday, 15 January 2009 09:21:33 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Book Review | Programming | Technical
# Tuesday, 20 May 2008
I found two interesting Visio 2007 stencils for BPMN and UML2. If you are interested, check out where I found them
Tuesday, 20 May 2008 19:43:23 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [2] -
English | Programming
# Monday, 17 March 2008
Monday, I passed the 70-631 exam to get a MCTS certification.
Monday, 17 March 2008 12:06:41 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
English | Programming | Technical
# Saturday, 04 August 2007
My next challenge for the next couple of weeks : testing the new Beta of VS 2008 TFS...
Saturday, 04 August 2007 21:22:19 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming
# Saturday, 31 March 2007
The link provided in this post may provide good starting points on how to build a development environment for SharePoint
Saturday, 31 March 2007 17:28:17 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | SharePoint | Technical
# Thursday, 22 March 2007
If you want to display a .NET web form in a modal dialog, this post may be useful for you....
Thursday, 22 March 2007 21:46:09 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Thursday, 25 January 2007
How to refresh automatically all the PivotTables contained in an Excel Workbook...
Thursday, 25 January 2007 13:11:51 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical | VBA
# Monday, 27 November 2006
Sometimes, tuning cache expiration timing and attachment format is not enough to avoid this error message. Maybe it is _your_ code that cause this error to happen...
Monday, 27 November 2006 13:39:11 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Monday, 20 November 2006
A start of building a list of question to help to decide what is really needed when the application needs a workflow engine...
Monday, 20 November 2006 22:17:33 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Tuesday, 26 September 2006
I found a new toy helping me to debug Javascript code. It was existing since long time since it is shipped with Windows 2000. But, to use it, you need to know it exists.....
Tuesday, 26 September 2006 16:14:48 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Friday, 08 September 2006
ZapThink organizes the 5th SOA practitioner's conference in Geneva. A good occasion to learn what is SOA and when it might apply in software developments.
Friday, 08 September 2006 09:02:54 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
English | Programming | SOA | Technical
# Wednesday, 10 May 2006
I am not sure, but I maybe found a bug in the System.IO.Ports.SerialPort class implementation. Indeed, setting the StopBits property of that class to StopBits.None is causing an ArgumentOutOfRange exception.
Wednesday, 10 May 2006 22:18:14 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
English | Programming | Technical
# Thursday, 09 March 2006
Voilà quelques années que les TechDays font partie de mon agenda. Les TechDays, ce sont deux jours de conférences sur les technologies Microsoft plus ou moins poussées.
Thursday, 09 March 2006 10:01:53 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Friday, 29 July 2005
Un exemple de code SQL vraiment très beau à voir. An example of a very nice SQL code.
Friday, 29 July 2005 16:06:39 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Monday, 11 July 2005
Il n'est pas possible d'être notifié quand une orchestration BizTalk se termine. Ce post montre un moyen d'y arriver tout de même, mais en utilisant WMI. It is not possible to be notified when a BizTalk orchestration ends. This post shows how we can do that, using WMI.
Monday, 11 July 2005 13:34:22 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
BTS2004 | Programming | Technical
# Monday, 04 July 2005
Comment changer le nom d'un serveur BizTalk. How to change a BizTalk server name.
Monday, 04 July 2005 14:54:29 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
BTS2004 | Programming | Technical
# Tuesday, 17 May 2005
Une petite chose à se remémorer sur les tableaux... A little thing to remember about arrays...
Tuesday, 17 May 2005 16:39:25 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Programming | Technical
# Thursday, 31 March 2005
Le code HRESULT affecté dans le constructeur d'une exception n'est pas anodin. Pour qu'une erreur soit détectée du côté client, il faut que cette valeur soit supérieur à 0x80000000. The HRESULT code set in an exception constructor is very important. In order to detect the error on the client side, that value must be greater than 0x80000000.
Thursday, 31 March 2005 08:13:53 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0] -
Technical | Programming
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Disclaimer
The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.

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